Why and How Cats Have Seizures

Why and How Cats Have SeizuresIt’s likely that seizures in cats, as with those in humans, are linked to the prefrontal cortex. This part of the brain is responsible for decision making, personality, and other cognitive behaviors. During times of stress, the body produces hormones that may lead to a seizure.

Symptoms of Seizures in Cats
Typical symptoms of a cat’s seizure include a sudden collapse, loss of awareness, violent shaking of all four limbs, chewing and/or twitching of the face, and often salivation, urination and defecation. Seizures can range from mild to heavy, and the severity varies across individuals and circumstances. These symptoms typically last from one to three minutes. Some cats are prone to seizures after a particular trigger, while some just have these episodes on random occasions.

Common Causes of Seizures in Cats
Both environmental factors and brain chemistry factor into a cat’s propensity to suffer from seizures. The ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center warns that many times, seizures in cats occur as a result of human action. Here are some common toxins that have been linked to seizures in cats according to the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center.

Common Toxins That Cause Seizures In Cats

  • Permethrin
  • Fluoroquinolone antibiotics
  • Diphenhydramine
  • Amitriptyline
  • Mirtazapine
  • Ibuprofen
  • Tea Tree
  • Alpha lipoic acid
  • Minodixil
  • Acetaminophen
  • Ivermectin and Moxidectin
  • Baclofen
  • Bromethalin

Be sure to keep any of the following toxins away from cats. Seizures can be very frightening for both the cat and the owner. It is important to remain calm and to not interfere with the cat during the seizure. Be sure to also make note of how long it lasts. Just like humans, cats can also suffer permanent damage to the brain if not treated on time.

If you notice your cat suffering, be sure to seek medical attention immediately. Additionally, it is important to take them in for regular checkups, so be sure to schedule your appointment at Hunt Valley Animal Hospital today!

Hunt Valley
Animal Hospital

11206 York Road
Cockeysville, MD 21030

Phone: 410-527-0800
Fax: 410-527-0041

Hospital Hours

Monday - Friday: 7:30am-7:30pm
Saturday: 8:00am-4:00pm

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